Tag Archives: Planet Noun

Queen Sugar episode 3: gun pulls, cheap offers, southern (dis)courtesy

This episode opens with a reading of Ernest Bordelon’s will. Ralph Angel, Nova, Aunt Vi and Charley are present.

Aunt Vi gets the boat. The kids get the land, and Ernest wants them to farm it. Charley and Nova want no part of it. First order of business is to take care of business (i.e., sell the land) so Charley can return to her mess of a marriage in Los Angeles, and Nova can to back to her life in NOLA.

Ralph Angel gets upset because his sisters don’t want it. He’s looking at this inheritance as a chance to start fresh.

As the siblings tiff it out, Charley calls Sam Landry, who says he’ll make them an offer in person.


Vi didn’t purposely shut the door… she just didn’t expend the energy to leave it open for him.


Back at Vi’s house, Davis shows up. Vi ain’t feeling his tail, not even enough for the perfunctory response when Davis says “Hello.” She turns around, puts her watering can down and walks into the house. Davis follows her… and meets a screen door slam. Vi didn’t purposely shut the door… she just didn’t expend the energy to leave it open for him.

Inside, Hollywood offers Davis some coffee. Auntie Vi let everyone know all the coffee is gone… and the sweet tea. She kind of sounds like the cafeteria lady from Cedric The Entertainer’s short-lived sketch comedy show.

Charley walks into the room, basically seeps from her pores that she doesn’t want anything to do with the air that liar breathes.

Continue reading Queen Sugar episode 3: gun pulls, cheap offers, southern (dis)courtesy

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Quick-Fast Book Review: Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl

Issa Rae and I seem like two peas in a pod… Except she’s famous and I’m not.

And her dad’s a doctor, and she went to school in Brentwood and to Stanford… And my dad isn’t, and I didn’t attend a snazzy Brentwood school or Stanford.

At my high school, we held assembly programs called “Chapel.” We  sang songs about Jesus.

We also had folks who could rap like nobody’s business.

I was NOT one of them.

But I was plenty awkward. And though some folks thought me cute and told me so, it wasn’t enough to get anyone to ask me out in high school. So even thought I didn’t THINK I was ugly, I assumed folks didn’t find me attractive.  Honey, there were no boys  beating a path to my door, or keeping my parent’s phone line busy trying to hear my voice.

By reading The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl, I felt somewhat at home within the awkward experiences of Issa Diop, also known as Issa Rae.

Socially awkward? I so got that as a kid.

Heck, I get that as an adult.  I still occasionally say things that elicit uncomfortable silences.

Bad dancing? Jury’s out on that. I just move to the rhythm and don’t try too hard. Nothing inspiring.  Let’s move on.

Trying hard to impress? When I was younger, occasionally. I can’t recall the moment I realized how stupid that was and stopped. I can only be me.

I enjoyed the escapades and familiar landscapes of the Awkward Black Girl web series. Also enjoyable, reading about some of Issa Rae’s defining moments.

Here’s the joy of this book: It seems so incomplete. And that’s awesome! Her story’s still in progress. I’m looking forward to more from Issa Rae, whether via web series, book, TV, radio or if packaged in podcast or comic book forms.

She’s a talent with a unique voice that can speak to everyday nerdy awkward black girls—and anyone who dares to just BE.

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Book Review #5 | Quiet Strength

This week’s Review is a memoir by Tony Dungy—called Quiet Strength.

This book chronicles Tony Dungy’s journey—from his formative years in Jackson, Michigan, to the coach of the 2007 Superbowl champion Indianapolis Colts. The backbone of Dungy’s belief is that all should strive for excellence—and resolute strength in whatever sphere we may occupy—through disappointment, tragedy and happy times. This book was published in 2007, and though not exactly a new release, it contains timeless advice.

I like this book because it is a nice read for one, and it is a reminder that no one is alone in his or her journey. Dungy also shares about the suicide of his son. If there is anything I can imagine would send a parent into a depressive spiral, that is one of the things I can imagine. However, Dungy decided to follow the counsel he had given others through the years—including football players… And trust God through the pain—and keep their minds on God—no matter what. So no cursing or cussing God and shaking fists to the sky. Instead of asking “why” Dungy asked what he could learn from the situation—what could he do for God—and to help others.

Another recommended read—mainly because of its inspirational and uplifting value.

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Jason Nelson | Shifting the Atmosphere With Praise


Jason Nelson talks about his single “Shifting the Atmosphere” and his history with BET’s Bobby Jones Gospel!

Jason Nelson’s single “Shifting the Atmosphere” swiftly shifted  its way through the Gospel music world. Not only is this tune blessing many, it’s also managed to maintain a prominent place on Billboard’s Gospel Songs chart for 39 weeks.

Liz had the opportunity chat with Jason Nelson about the 32nd season of Bobby Jones Gospel, a weekly staple in the Gospel music community.   Nelson also gave his perspective on events that were hot topics at the time of the interview.  The controversy discussed actually calmed in the weeks following this interview, but is still making occasional reappearances in the news.

Enjoy the interview, comment, and subscribe on YouTube!

 

 

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Richard Smallwood | Creator of Timeless Gospel Classics


What’s amazing about Richard Smallwood, is the fact that people told him that his music wouldn’t sell.  Planet Noun’s Liz Anderson found that almost unbelievable—because she’s been a fan for years—and one of the key features of his music—is its timeless, classic sound.

Liz had an opportunity to talk with Smallwood for a few minutes about his latest projects, including an autobiography that’s in the works—complete with information about his genealogy!

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Anthony Brown of Anthony Brown and Group Therapy | Laid Back, Ordinary Guy


He was dressed in sweats and a t-shirt, and donned a cap throughout the interview—he seemed so laid-back, Liz later noted that it was as if she were talking to one of her own brothers.

One thought that meandered through her mind—“If I saw him on the street, I wouldn’t be able to tell this guy performs in front of many, and is a writer, singer, director or producer.  He’s so cool!”

Brown and Liz shared a few minutes talking about the off-stage Anthony Brown.  An ordinary guy—the introverted leader and talented performer.

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Tamela Mann’s Best Days are ahead–literally, and figuratively! (Inaugural interview)

Tamela Mann has enjoyed phenomenal success since the August 2012 release of her album “Best Days”, a GRAMMY ® nomination.

To celebrate the official (albeit quiet) launch of Planet Noun, enjoy our inaugural YouTube video, which was released two days before August 2012 release of “Best Days”.  Mann discusses the album and the lyrical resonance the hit song “Take Me to the King” has had with the public.  She also gives a sneak peek into a new cooking show that she and husband David have in the works.


Mann, her husband David, and her son were all warm, gracious, and yes—David Mann is hilarious in real life.  If Ms. Tamela’s entourage is any indication of her personal priorities, the sweet fragrance of a loving family must be at the tip-top of that list!

Find out about this and more—on Planet Noun—where we cover people, places, things, and ideas!

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